Follow us on...
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Watch us on YouTube
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Transistor

  1. #1
    Senior Member Madcat32's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    143
    PSN ID
    Madcat32
    Rep Power
    13

    Transistor

    It's a RPG type game done in isometric 3d with a novel approach to fighting in that you can freeze time and select turn based type moves and then unfreeze time or just play in real time battles.

    Here's a review:

    http://www.vg247.com/2014/05/20/transistor-ps4-review/

    Looks quite an original game and I'm going to get it:


    Transistor developer SuperGiant Games had a hard act to follow with its previous release Bastion, but Dave Cook feels you have nothing to worry about.


    transistor_art
    ĒIf I had to quickly compare Transistorís combat to another gameís battle system, Iíd say it falls close to Squareís original Parasite Eve game. Thatís definitely a good thing.Ē
    If youíre fed up with sequels and overly-familiar ideas you might want to give Transistor a look-see, as itís one of those rare titles that boasts unique artistic direction, intriguing gameplay concepts and an engrossing plot to match. Games like this only come around so often and make the big releases feel dull by comparison. It deserves to be played.

    Where SuperGiantís debut Bastion presented players with real-time combat that veered towards hack-and-slash country, Transistor is a more tactical affair. It takes place in the utopian city of Cloudbank, a neon-lit swell of artisan architecture and cultural opulence that has become infested by an army of automatons known as the Process. To make matters worse, whole sectors of the metropolis are disappearing, and somehow a mysterious sword known as the Transistor is the key to it all.

    It falls into the hands of Red, a former starlet of Cloudbank who has lost her voice and finds herself pursued by the Process. SuperGiantís decision to cast a mute lead is quite ingenious, as your only guiding voice is the Transistor itself. Like Bastionís narrator, the device comments on occurrences in the world and reacts to the playerís actions on cue to give them greater insight into the world and to drip-feed exposition along the way. Itís a superb narrative tool.

    transistor_1
    The plot is ambiguous at the outset, but as you progress youíll gain a deeper understanding of what the Transistor is and how it relates to Redís plight. I wonít spoil too much here, but itís a great story that offers twists and turns as you go, either through news terminals dotted around the environment, audio messages left by the shadowy Camarata organisation or lavish cut-scenes.

    All of the story-telling is threaded through combat, which is dispensed through real-time battles that can be paused to cue up tactical attacks and movements using a mechanic called Turn(). If I had to quickly compare it to another gameís battle system, Iíd say it falls close to Squareís original Parasite Eve game. Thatís definitely a good thing.

    ĒSuperGiantís learning curve is steep at points, but it forces you to think laterally about combat. Once ranged, area-of-effect, buffing, shielding and healing enemies come into play, youíll be thankful for taking time to learn the rules.Ē
    Because the Transistor is heavy, Redís attacks are quite slow when youíre simply spamming commands, and while this works against low-level Process robots, youíll find that youíll need to plan each move meticulously once ranged droids and those with healing and defensive buffs enter the equation.

    Each Turn() speeds up Redís movement considerably and comes with a gauge that fills as you move her around the battle area or initiate attacks. Once satisfied or out of meter you can unleash your moves in rapid sequence, but itíll take time before you can pause the action again. You have to think about cool-down very carefully, and I found myself overcome with relief after barely surviving some of the gameís harder encounters. Itís a gratifying experience.

    Hereís a practical battle example: I can pause the action using Turn() then spend some gauge walking up to a Process and hit it with Crash() to inflict stun and lower its defence. I can then walk around the target to get a damage boost by back-stabbing it with Breach(), before using Jaunt() to sprint behind the nearest piece of cover. Not only will this let me escape any follow-up attacks, it can also make the enemy lose sight of me, allowing time for my next Turn() to recharge.

    transistor_ps4
    It gets deeper as Red levels up and unlocks new abilities that can either be used as attacks or slotted as either passive or active buffs. Take Bounce(), a ranged projectile that ricochets between targets to inflict damage. I found that by stacking it with Switch(), a move that turns enemies into allies for a short time, I could fire off a shot that bounced between a group of targets to render them friendly until my next Turn() charged. Itís genius.

    Or instead of using Jaunt() as a sprint move, I can equip it as a passive ability that reduces my Turn() recharge time, or couple stealth skill Mask() with rapid-shot ability Ping() to dispense a savage burst of heightened back-stab blows. There are so many possibilities in there, and just like Bastion you can equip Limiters to make enemies harder but increase your XP gain. Itís a superb risk-reward mechanic that really does pile on the pressure as you progress, and makes you scrutinise every battle that little bit more.

    ĒDo yourself a favour and seek out Transistor to remind yourself that this industryís imagination isnít all dried up; you just need to look away from the dizzying shadow of those tired blockbusters to see it.Ē
    SuperGiantís learning curve is steep at points, but it forces you to think laterally about combat. Once ranged, area-of-effect, buffing, shielding and healing enemies come into play, youíll be thankful for taking time to learn the rules.

    Fighting aside, what you have here is a beautifully-depicted, emotionally engaging journey that splices passive horizon-gazing and narrative with bouts of tense, considered fighting, while smacking you with peaks and troughs of pressure at just the right tempo to keep things interesting.

    The studio ditched publishers for the release of Transistor, but I donít think the game will be a hard sell without the might of a big company behind it. If thereís any justice in the world this game will shift units due to its many qualities, and will hopefully sit in stark contrast to the endless cycle of sequels and uninspired ideas that continue to bog the AAA world down.

    Do yourself a favour and seek out Transistor to remind yourself that this industryís imagination isnít all dried up; you just need to look away from the dizzying shadow of those tired blockbusters to see it.

  2. #2
    Member frankmarco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    62
    PSN ID
    frankmarco
    Rep Power
    9
    I was a big fan of Bastion and I waited for transistor. I didn't play it yet but I'm sure it will be a wonderful game. For people who don't know bastion I suggest to try it.

  3. #3
    See-Elle Ciel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    647
    PSN ID
    Spokey-Who
    Rep Power
    34
    This game is... to put it simply, wonderful; it plays like an RTS which I was not expecting as I generally do not follow games I know I'll be interested in--I like to be surprised.

    ------------------------------------------------------
    [ READING TODAY FOR A BETTER TOMORROW ]

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: August 15th, 2013, 12:18 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •